Thursday, April 6, 2017

Salted Pollock Croquettes

Salted Pollock Croquettes
Growing up fish sticks with ketchup was my only source of seafood. No amount of cajoling could get me to try anything new. Thanks goodness that has all changed and as an adult I’ve grown to love all types of seafood. In fact in a few weeks we leave for Oregon, where we spend our summers. We stay in a small coastal town with each restaurant touting that they make the best clam chowder and fish and chips. A few weeks ago I was contacted by a representative of CFE, (Canadian Fish Exporters, Inc) to participate in their International Saltfish Blogger Recipe Challenge. I happily accepted. You can read about the contest here. I’m always up for a new food challenge. I received salted pollock an ingredient that I’ve never worked with before so a little research was needed.

BacalaRico

Salted Pollock is a white fish that has been cured with dry salt to preserve it. This preservation method is one of the oldest in the world. Back in the day this technique kept fish available year round without the need for refrigeration. Another benefit is that it preserves many nutrients and some might even go as far to say the end result is tastier. Before salt pollock can be cooked it must be rehydrated and desalted. To accomplish this you should soak the fish in cold water for three days, changing the water two to three times a day.

For today’s recipe I prepared a pollock croquette. It’s crisp on the outside and pillowy soft on the inside. It’s a mixture of salted pollock and potatoes with lemon zest and herbs. The fish was simmered in a milk and water bath with herbs and spices and then shredded.

shredded fish
Mashed Yukon potatoes were combined with the fish and the juice and zest of a lemon and scallions. The mixture was formed with a tablespoon and then rolled in flour, egg and panko. The flavor was delicious, I hope you enjoy these croquettes as much as we did. I served these with lemon wedges and a horseradish cocktail sauce. Perfect appetizer for games and parties.


yield: 20 to 22 pieces, depending on the sizeprint recipe

Salted Pollock Croquettes

INGREDIENTS:

  • 12 ounces Bacala Rico choice boned salted pollock fillets
  • 2 cups milk
  • 1 medium onion, cut into large pieces
  • 8 sprigs thyme
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 4 cloves garlic, 2 smashed, 2 minced
  • 8 black peppercorns
  • 1 pound Yukon potatoes, peeled and cubed
  • 3 eggs, divided
  • 1 medium shallot, minced
  • 2 scallions, sliced thin
  • 3 lemons, 1 zest and juice, 2 cut into sliced for serving
  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 1/2 cups panko
  • Vegetable or canola oil

INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. Drain and rinse the pollock. Place in a large saucepan with milk, onion, thyme, bay leaves, garlic and peppercorns. Add just enough water to cover fish over a few inches. Bring to a boil then reduce heat to a simmer. Cook for 20 to 25 minutes, until fish breaks apart and is easy to flake, drain mixture, place fish on a plate and shred using two forks.
  2. Meanwhile cook potatoes in boiling water until tender, about 15 minutes, drain and mash.
  3. In a small skillet sauté shallot until tender about 8 to 10 minutes, add minced garlic and stir continuously 1 more minute. Mix together mashed potatoes with 1 beaten egg, scallions, pollock and lemon zest.
  4. Refrigerate mixture until chilled, about 3 to 4 hours.
  5. When chilled use tablespoon to form into balls or sticks.
  6. Set up a work station with 3 bowls, one with the flour, one with the 2 beaten eggs, and the third with the panko. Now roll them one by one into the flour, then the eggs and then the panko and set them on a prepared tray (wax paper works well here).
  7. In a deep skillet on medium-high heat add about an ½ inch of oil. When oil is hot add 4 to 5 sticks at a time and cook until golden brown about 3 to 4 minutes. (you can tell when oil is hot it almost shimmers).
  8. Set on paper towel to drain and repeat with remaining oil and croquette mixture.
  9. Serve with lemon slices and cocktail sauce or dipping sauce of your choice.
Created using The Recipes Generator


CFE International offers a number of brands of salt fish: Buena Ventura, Cristobal, BacalaRico, and Isla Brisa. You can find BacalaRico pollock at the Los Altos Ranch Markets here in Arizona.

For more information about CFE International and their products you can follow them on social media:

Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Instagram


Cheri Savory Spoon
Cheri Savory Spoon

Mysavoryspoon was first started in 2010 as a way to journal recipes that I had collected from cookbooks, magazines, family and friends. Most everything was savory, using legumes and whole grains. Along the way I discovered a love for baking. Now a couple times a month you might see some type of sweet pie or treat.

26 comments:

  1. What a great use of the salted fish. We get something here called bokkoms. They are salt preserved locally caught fish. They don't smell too good though.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Tandy, this was my first time working with salt fish, great experience.

      Delete
  2. The only seafood my husband would eat once in a year is fish croquettes. These look really crunchy and great!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Angie, these were crunchy on the outside and soft on the inside.

      Delete
  3. How lovely are these, Cheri. That's such a good way to use those fish fillets . Y rose to the challenge

    ReplyDelete
  4. Love how crunchy and delicious these look, Cheri. My husband love fish croquettes and I am sure he would love this. Have a lovely weekend. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Anu, wishing you a wonderful week-end!

      Delete
  5. Oooh this looks so good Cheri! I have never worked with salt preserved fish either, though "salt cod" runs easily off my tongue, so I think I may have eaten that as a child. I love the concentrated flavors of food that has been dried!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Inger, my husband's family had the bacala during the holidays, but for me it was a fairly new ingredient.

      Delete
  6. I think you should win this contest. Your croquettes look fantastic. I don't ever remember having salted fish.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Gerlinde, this was my first time preparing and eating them myself, they were delicious.

      Delete
  7. I wish we had a Los Altos Ranch Market here in Tucson, Cheri! I am always looking for things like this salted pollock.. love your croquettes! Mark has memories like you of fish sticks and tartar sauce - took me years to get him (and his family) to eat real fish!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi David, I was surprised to find out we have 5 Los Altos markets here, had no idea. They do have a little bit of everything. Sounds like you have converted Mark, it's all the great food that you prepare;)

      Delete
  8. I bet these are delicious! I made homemade fish sticks last year and loved them. I bet these would be great with the scallions and potatoes inside. I can't believe it's time to travel to Oregon again - seems like you just got back to the desert. I know you're anxious to get back to the garden and the beautiful walks and gorgeous views. And I can't wait to hear all about it!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks tricia, yes I am getting antsy can't wait to get back it has been a very wet year.

      Delete
  9. These look amazing, Cheri. They remind me of my childhood, in a very good way. All the best, D

    ReplyDelete
  10. Perfection! I can imagine the salty fish and the Yukon golds make for one delectable meal. Love foods which provide the crunch on the outside and are creamy smooth inside. Good luck on the contest!

    ReplyDelete
  11. These sound delicious CHeri!! I bet they are too! Would love to try this recipe out- thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
  12. This sounds so interesting. Living in the midwest, my exposure to seafood is so minimal, that I really shy away from most seafood recipes. But, this is definitely a dish I would try!

    ReplyDelete