Thursday, October 19, 2017

Szechuan Eggplant Stir-Fry

Szechuan Eggplant Stir-Fry
Yesterday was the second week of the Phoenix farmers market. I came armed with my insulated soft cooler and camera. After arriving I was over taken by the variety and beauty of the fruits and veggies, a plant eaters paradise for sure. Once again I forgot to take pictures. The farmers markets in the desert are very impressive in the fall and winter, just the opposite of the Oregon coast. Would love to have shared some pics, well, there’s always next time;)

One of the first veggies I placed in my basket was the Japanese eggplant. They are long and thin with a lovely purplish hue and firm flesh. When cooked they become soft, creamy and practically melt in your mouth. I decided a stir-fry would be a great way to cook up this variety of eggplant. And when I think of stir-fry I think of hot, spicy and lots of flavor. The trick is to cook the eggplant in very hot oil and not crowd the pan. I served the eggplant on a bed of jasmine rice but you could also serve it on rice noodles. Hope you like this as much as we did.

This recipe has been slightly adapted from the Food Network.

Szechuan Eggplant Stir-Fry Plated


Yield: 3 to 4

Szechuan Eggplant Stir-Fry

INGREDIENTS:


  • 2 pounds of Japanese eggplants, cut lengthwise and then cut crosswise into 1 inch pieces
  • 3 tablespoons peanut or canola oil
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • 3 green onions, white and green parts, sliced thinly on a diagonal, divided, save 1/3 for garnish
  • 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 fresh red chile, sliced
  • 1/2 cup vegetable broth
  • 3 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon rice or white wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon light brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 1 tablespoon cilantro for garnish

INSTRUCTIONS:


  1. In a small bowl, mix the soy sauce, vinegar, sugar, and cornstarch until the sugar and cornstarch are dissolved.
  2. Heat wok over medium-high heat and add peanut and sesame oil, When you see a light ripple in the oil add a single layer of eggplant, stir-fry until lightly browned, about 3 to 4 minutes. Remove and set aside, cook the remaining eggplant in the same way, add more oil, if needed, add to same dish, set aside.
  3. Now add green onions, ginger, garlic, and chile; and stir until fragrant, 1 to 2 minutes. Add broth and soy sauce mixture into the wok and cook another minute, the sauce should thicken slightly. Add back in the eggplant, stir until the sauce is absorbed. Garnish with green onions and cilantro. Serve with rice or noodles.

notes

Have all ingredients prepped beforehand. Also cook the eggplant in very hot oil and not crowd the pan.
Created using The Recipes Generator
Cheri Savory Spoon
Cheri Savory Spoon

Mysavoryspoon was first started in 2010 as a way to journal recipes that I had collected from cookbooks, magazines, family and friends. Most everything was savory, using legumes and whole grains. Along the way I discovered a love for baking. Now a couple times a month you might see some type of sweet pie or treat.

39 comments:

  1. I love japanese eggplant but can't always get my hands on some (which makes me sad lol). This stir-fry sounds right up my alley!

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    1. Thanks Ashley, feeling fortunate this year!

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  2. I love that eggplant is used in so many international dishes! This one sounds wonderful and I agree, Japanese eggplants are the cream of the crop!

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    1. Me too Chris, usually I prepare them the same way each time, trying to change that.

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  3. Love Jananese eggplants! And this dish, spicy and hot looks delicious! I had to laugh, I too take the camera with me and at times forget to take photos as well! Have a great weekend!

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    1. Thanks Anna and Liz, have a great weekend and happy fall!

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  5. I love szechuan flavour! Don't see Japanese eggplants here...they are my favourite too.

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    1. Thanks Angie, feeling fortunate to be able to buy such healthy looking eggplant, not sure how much longer they will be available.

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  6. Hi Cheri. This dish looks divine, mouthwatering. I love Japanese eggplants. So delicate. I look forward to the farmers' market photos when you have them. Thanks so much for all you do. D

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    1. Thanks Dena, was just over at your blog looking at your lovely fall pics, thats something that we don't see much of here in the desert. Take care;)

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  7. The market sounds wonderful! Taking pictures sometimes makes it hard to enjoy the whole experience. So we understand :) Love this stir fry - and I don't eat Japanese eggplant enough. Thanks for the inspiration!

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    1. Thanks Tricia, yes it does doesn't it, over the summer I felt that I wasn't enjoying things like I should so I took a break.

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  8. This is a delightful stir-fry recipe, Cheri! Can't wait to give it a try!

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    1. Thanks Agness, loved the eggplant this way





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  9. This looks delicious! We've been inundated with regular eggplant from my relative's garden so I've been trying to come up with ways to use it all the time.

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    1. Sounds like you are a wondeful resourceful parent......

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  10. You've reminded me I tagged a similar recipe a long time ago I never tried! I used to hate eggplant as a kid but now I really enjoy it. Such a perfect stir-fry. Looks like you did it perfectly, Cheri!

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    1. Thanks Monica, I think this variety of eggplant is made for a stir-fry.

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  11. A good excuse to go back and get more of these great vegetable varieties, and photographs.

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  12. So I guess I will be getting some Japanese Eggplant at the market tomorrow! This looks amazing, Cheri!

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    1. Thanks David, can't beleive how great the produce is at the farmers market already.

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  13. I've wanted to try growing Japanese eggplant but can never find it at the nurseries here :( What a delicious way to use it. Love those flavors!

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    1. Thanks Susan, Love the sweetness of this variety.

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  14. i've never tried japanese eggplant! there are many things about the other kind that i don't like, so i'd love to give a new variety a try!

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    1. Hi Grace, hope you have a chance to give it a try, so much sweeter and tastier, although I do like the globe variety as well;)

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  15. I love farmers' markets. I always get carried away and buy too much :-)
    Amalia
    xo

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  16. I love a good farmers market, and this recipe sounds delicious. I don’t think I’ve had Japanese eggplant before, I shall go on the hunt for it sounds yummy.

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  17. Our farmers markets really start getting good when the weather starts cooling off a little. I'll have to be on the lookout for the Japanese eggplant. I enjoy it for its very creamy texture and slightly sweet taste.

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  18. I can't imagine the fun going to a farmer's market in Phoenix. The different veggies would be amazing, I'm sure. I've never noticed Japanese eggplant locally, but I will definitely be watching for them now that I know how different they are from the traditional eggplant.

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    1. Thanks Kris, yes I love them stir-fried, they are slightly sweet and the texture is wonderful.

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  19. Japanese nasu (eggplant) truly are beautiful foundations for spices...Szechuan style!

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  20. I see Japanese eggplants from time to time at my store, but I've never tried one. Now I have a great recipe to give one a try. Looks really delicious, Cheri and we love the Asian flavors!

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    1. Thanks Marcelle, hope you give them a try they are delicious.

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